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62 



TA TTLER 

Williamsburg High School 
Williamsburg, Massachusetts 

Volume 45 
American Yearbook Company, Publishers 



The theme of this year's Tattler is GO 
because this word describes Williams- 
burg High School so well. The friendly, 
enthusiastic students and the helpful, 
encouraging teachers have given our 
school a spirit of readiness to try any- 
thing novel. The students have organ- 
ized a pep club; a Christmas ball was 
held; a group of students and faculty 
members was formed to arrange inter- 
esting assemblies. Plans for a regional 
school have been made and land in West- 
hampton has been selected for the site. 
The various faculty departments have 
met and discussed the curriculum of this 
new school, and many new courses will 
be offered. The students and the faculty 
are making progress in improving our 
school not only in a material way, but also 
are striving to make it recognized as a 
school with true sportsmanship, school 
loyalty, and most important, enthusiasm 
to GO ahead and meet any challenge. 






Editorial 



Contents 







Academics 


5 


Activities 


13 


Athletics 


31 


Students 


45 


Seniors 


49 ] 


Advertisements 


62 






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Dedication 




When James Cernak passed away, many of us, for the 
first time, realized the true value of his friendship. 
Jim always stood by his friends; he helped them when 
they wanted to be helped and listened to them when 
they wanted to be heard. Beneath his rough exterior 
was a quiet and sensitive boy. He never took life for 
granted and only hoped it would not do so to him. And 
so it is, that Jim is to be the recipient of this dedica- 
tion. With fond memories, we. the class of 1968, 
dedicate this yearbook to our former friend and 
classmate'. James Cernak. 



DISCO VERIES, 
LECTURES, 
SPEED TESTS, 
W.H.S. ON THE 




Faculty Members Strive 
Constantly For Improvement 




Mrs. Eleanor Bart, Commercial 
Mr. Robert Branch, Mathematics 
Mr. David Butterfield, Latin, History 



Mrs. Hilda DeNood, French 

Mr. George Feiker, Guidance 

Mr. David Grills, Physical Education 



Mrs. Frances Grinnell, Commercial 
Mrs. Margaret Halberstadt, English 
Mrs. Evelyn Kmit, Physical Education 



Mr. Louis LaRoche, Scie- 
Mr. Arnold Matz, German 
Mr. Herbert Montebello, Hist 



Mrs. Anne Graves, secretary, 
is an invaluable member of 
the staff. 




iiM 




x 



Each faculty member at W.H.S. feels that to educate students, he 
must continue to educate himself. Therefore, during the summer 
months the teachers themselves further their educations. Some do 
graduate work and attend special courses. Others travel to nearly 
all corners of the globe to gain first-hand knowledge of foreign 
countries . 




i 



/ 




1 Paul Knight, Principal, posts the sched- 
Ijof coming activities. 




Mr. George 'Munroe, 
Science 

Mrs. Sarah O'Donnell, 
English 



Mrs. Marie Packard, 
English 

Mrs. Katherine Rapa- 
lee, Music 



Mr. Richard Bjork- 
lund, Commercial 

Mr. David Wyman, 
Science 





coach and Vice Principal, Mr. Earl 

-t, adds vitality to all our undertakings. 



Superintendent of Schools, Mr. Donald Buss, spends many 
hours working with the Regional School Committee. 






In the past year the W.H.S. curriculum has been supplemented by 
additional activities both inside and outside the classroom. Students 
again received the opportunity to attend a Shakespearean play, THE 
TEMPEST, at Amherst College. The curriculum in some more ad- 
vanced language and social studies courses has remained flexible to 
meet the students' interests and abilities. The students in the senior 
Problems of Democracy course select the units they wish to study, 
such as Communism, Crime, and Civil Rights. In connection with the 
Crime unit, the class received a small capsule of marijuana from a 
law agency to acquaint them with the odor of the drug. The advanced 
French class does its reading from varying sources, according to the 
ability of the class. The frequent use of practice teachers gives stu- 
dents new ideas and viewpoints on the subjects they study. The 
W.H.S. faculty is now meeting to determine the curriculum of the 
new regional school to open in 1970, and we expect these meetings 
will lead to many beneficial changes in the present course offerings. 






Language And History Classes Correlate 





James Minelli, Russell Culver, Carol Hebert, Steven Clark, Barbara Pelissier, 
and Deborah Ford take notes in Government class. 




Carrie Crompton notes the Shake- 
spearean play on the bulletin 
board. 




Robert Rocheleau gives an 
example of a vowel in French 
class. 




German teacher, Mr. Matz, 
points out important con- 
structions in a German 
newspaper to Richard 
Barrett. 




To aid Mrs. DeNood, Mr. Tonet, Mr. Matz, and Mr. 
Butterfield in their French, German, and Latin in- 
struction respectively, W.H.S. has several helpful 
devices. The tape recorder is used most often in 
language classes. The teachers have sets of tapes 
corresponding to each lesson in which students are 
to respond to certain drills. Besides emphasizing 
a grammar rule, each drill may increase the stu- 
dent's vocabulary, as well as improve his pronun- 
ciation. Record players are sometimes used when 
records, not tapes, are available. Occasionally a 
filmstrip may be shown to inform the class of the 
country's history or geography. 



jranslating English sentences into Latin 
loves easy for Sue Gardenier and Jackie 
'ebb. 



Mr. LaRochc and 
Charlie Norris 
work out a 
chemical for- 
mula. 



Science, Math, A 









+K 



George Lavalle and Leo Aloisi prepare a copper 
sulphate solution for a plating demonstration. 



-^ 









♦- 



Alan Golash takes 
over the geometry 
class. 



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10 



mmercial Subjects Are Closely Related 

\ Science, math, and business courses are in some respects related to each other. Stu- 
i dents find that a good background in mathematics is essential in certain sciences such 
as chemistry and physics. Math is actually a science in itself. In business courses 
also, math is a necessity. To be able to perform mathematical operations with great 
\ accuracy is of prime importance in some commercial subjects. 





Shorthand is Sue Kellogg 1 s 
favorite subject. 




Monty Clapp exercises his fingers 
in typing class. 



11 Bachand, Robert Scott, Donald Gray, 
Golash, Diane Warner, Joanne Hcaly, 
|oan Gagnon are busy at chemistry. 




Consumer Ed will prove invaluable to 

Gloria Bushee in later years. 



11 



Four Years Of Scholastic Excellence Is 
Rewarded Through Student Honors 

Much credit should be given to the students who form the Williamsburg Chapter of 
the National Honor Society. These seniors have maintained a scholastic average 
of eighty -five or better during their high school years and have shown outstanding 
degrees of service, leadership, and character. We should especially be proud 
that two of its members, Alan Loughnan and Denise Bickford, qualified as finalist 
and commendation winner respectively in the National Merit Qualifying Test which 
was held last spring. Credit should also be given to the six senior girls who 
served as marshals for last year's graduation exercises. As juniors they held the 
highest academic averages for girls over a three year period. 





GRADUATION MARSHALS 
Paula Pavelcsyk, Denise Bickford, Cheryl Tiley, Dawn Ford, 
Patricia Warner, JoAnn Cumm. 



WINNERS 
Denise Bickford and Alan Loughnan. 



HONOR SOCIETY 
Paula Pavelcsyk, Alan Lough- 
nan, Robert Ames, Cheryl 
Tiley, James Brown, Paul 
Howes, Denise Bickford, Rob- 
ert Wilson, William Brown. 




12 



DRAMATICS, 
FIELD TRIPS, 
PEP RALLIES, 
W.H.S. ON THE 




i<? 




ANALECT STAFF 
SEATED: Elaine Clark, Nancy Turner, Grace Bige- 
low, Betsy Feiker, Paula Pavelcsyk, Carrie Cromp- 
ton, Cynthia Davidson, Judy Connell, Patricia 
Warner, Amy Rapalee. STANDING: Beverly 
Parson, KathyMalone, Suzanne Rocheleau. 

Literary Achievements 
Are The Results 
Of Constant Work And 
Cooperation 

The first issue of the "Analect" 
reflects hard work and ingenuity. 




PRESS CLUB 
FRONT ROW: Teresa 
Vayda, Carrie Cromp- 
ton, Betsy Feiker, 
Kathy Malone, 
Beverly Parson. BACK 
ROW: Judy Connell, 
Elaine Clark, Diane 
Warner, Grace Bige- 
low, Cynthia David- 
son, Joanne Lawler, 
Amy Rapalee, Nancy 
Turner. 




14 




TATTLER STAFF 

FRONT ROW: Althea Buffum, Cynthia Blanchet, Cynthia Stone, Carolyn Judd, Jo-Ann Cumm, Joan Gagnon, 
Ann Kellogg, Denise Bickford, Patricia Warner. SECOND ROW: Sandra Pegg, Kathryn King, Cheryl Tiley, 
Donna Thackeray, Joanne Lawler, Sharon Loomis, Victoria Corwin, Dawn Ford, Ann Estes, Charlene Sylvester. 
BACK ROW: Robert Wilson, Robert Ames, Paul Howes, David Dewey, Larry West, Mahlon Parsons, Warren 
Messeck, William Brown, James Brown. 



An Enthusiastic Tattler Staff Headed By 
Devoted Officers Is The Key To A Fine Tattler 



A good yearbook is many 
things. It is first of all a 
complete history of the 
school year --a permanent 
book of factual records . 
Secondly, it is a promoter 
of school spirit . Finally, a 
yearbook is a memory book- 
a book which will recall to 
mind the thrilling experi- 
ences of high school. 



TATTLER OFFICERS 
David Dewey, Sandra Pegg, Jo- 
anne Lawler, Patricia Warner, 
Robert Ames, James Brown, 
Cheryl Tiley, Ann Kellogg. 



15 





STUDENT COUNCIL 
STANDING: Paul Howes. FRONT ROW: Gilda Rustemeyer, Joanne 
Lawler, James Taylor. SECOND ROW: Amy Rapalee, Larry West, 
Nancy Turner. THIRD ROW: Ronald Bachand. Peter Golash, Charles 
Norris. FOURTH ROW: Timothy Daggett . Brian Rapalee, James 
Brown. FIFTH ROW: Richard Barrett , Samuel Williston, David 
Dewey. 



The Student Council endeavors to provide within our 
school a climate conducive to the intellectual, physi- 
cal, social, and moral development of every member 
of the student body. This year the Council is empha- 
sizing recognition and reward for the outstanding in- 
dividual achievements of our students. It has there- 
fore initiated the Student Council Scholarship to be 
granted to the college -bound student who, because of 
his qualities of leadership, has done the most to pro- 
mote the general welfare of Williamsburg High School. 
The Council is also planning to sponsor the Student 
Council Merit Awards, to be granted for outstanding 
academic, athletic, and social achievements . Among 
other worthy projects, the Council carried on a Christ 
mas drive for the Care foundation; the generous re- 
sponse of students and faculty members shows our 
concern for our world brothers. 



Student Named 
To Make 
Washington Tri] 

WILLIAMSBURG — Paul B 
Howes of Main St.. Goshen, a 
senior at Williamsburg High 
School, was one of two high 
school seniors in the state se 
leeted recently, as Massachu- 
setts "Hearst Senator" to the 
sixth United States Senate 
Youth Program January in 
Washington, D.C. The othei 
selected. Walter J. Kelly, is | 
from West Roxbury. 

Starting Jan. 20. the pair. 
along with two delegates fn.m 
each of the other states and the 
District of Columbia, will spend 
a week in Washington. The pro- 
gram is made possible through 
a grant from the William Ran- 
dolph Hearst Foundation at no 
expense to the government or 
students. Each of the delegates 
is expected to meet both the 
President and Vice President 
and leading Congressmen. They 
will spend two afternoons as 
interns in the offices of their 
respective U.S. Senators. 

State Education Commander 
Owen B. Kiernan drew the 
names from a bowl containing 
almost :i00 entries, each repre- 
senting a different high school 
in the state. The program has 
been unanimously approved by 
voice vote of the Senate each 
year since its inception. It is 
designed to interest young peo- 
ple in public service careers. 



16 



Student Council Propels Action 



k rder to have a "go" sort of 
cpol, leaders must have the 
lusiasm and ability to make 

mk classmates work together. 

Hry year, students nominate 

■elect people who exhibit 
Me qualities. This September 
■school's walls were decorated 
Ipany colorful and clever 
■ers . On election day, lively 
■paign speeches, a new feature 
■ year, were made by each 
lidate. These speeches were 
It but to the point, each can- 
Ite promising to outdo all 
lis and previous class officers 
■to make his class a success 

>(| plenty of hard work, deter - 
ition, and cooperation of his 
smates . 



Hie 
liij 

) ft 




Diane Warner was successful in her campaign for office. 




Jubliant with victory, 
John Otis promises 
to fulfill the steps of 
his platform. 




CLASS OFFICERS 

Teresa Vayda, Harold Warner, Amy Edwards, James Taylor, Beverly Parsons, John Otis, Cynthia Davidson 
Javid McCutcheon, Diane Warner, Tim Daggett, Jean Pomeroy, Donald Gray. 



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Rank Certainly Dm 



This year's senior class certainly showed more "GO" than have previous classes 
against the unsuspecting freshmen at the traditional Freshmen Initiation held on 
September 29. They cleverly transformed the freshmen into a wide variety of 
weird beings with paint on their hair, faces, and bodies, and dressed the boys and 
girls in old clothing made for the opposite sex. The freshmen could not relax after 
the morning ordeal of serving and entertaining the seniors, for more initiation prau 
tices awaited them at the Freshmen Initiation Dance that night. Larry West, the 
senior class president, served as an excellent master of ceremonies in presenting 
the entertainment of the evening, the freshmen themselves. Paul Bacon, Carla 
Barrett, Steven Clark, Merry Frost, and James Minelli were chosen to read poems 
that they had written earlier entitled "Why I Like the Seniors"- -with a big shaving 
cream pie awaiting those whose poems were rejected. Next there was a male bath- 
ing beauty contest. James Taylor took first place, although Dale Beals, Russell 
Culver, David Shea, and Robert Thomas in their daring "two-piece" suits gave him 
stiff competition. A banana -eating contest followed with Natalie West and James 
Taylor easily defeating the other freshmen. 








FRONT ROW: Joan Cernak, Jane Hathaway. SECOND ROW: 
Alana English, Carol Hebert. THIRD ROW: Tommy Mosher, 
Donald Munson. 



Natalie end Jim steal the show. 



MarkEldred. David 
Kreps, Tim Hurd . 
Sam Williston, 
Natalie West, and 
James Taylor mode' 
classic wardrobes. 




18 






J 



ave Its Privileges 




STUDENT GUIDES 
FRONT ROW: Donald Gray, Brian Rapalee, William Graves, Robert Rocheleau, Robert 
Wilson, Peter Gorham, Robert Scott, Peter Golash. BACK ROW: James Brown, David 
Graves, David Dewey, George Lavalle, Paul Hathaway, Lawrence West, John Hall, 
Charles Norris, Timothy Daggett. 



There are seventeen students comprising the student guide system in our school. 
Under the direction of Mr. Tonet the guides keep the corridors in order between 
classes and are on duty at the cafeteria and at all assemblies. The cooperation 
of the whole student body is required to make the student guide system successful 



Bill Graves prepares to 
monitor the halls between 
periods. 



19 





THE SALVATION OF LONNY McCAIN 
FRONT ROW: Dennis Leamy, Larry West, Douglas Vile, 
David Shea, James Taylor, James Edwards. BACK ROW: 
Sandra Craves, Man - Brisbois, Terry Browne , Denise Bick- 
ford . Nancy Turner. Suzanne Rocheleau. 



Stage manager Pete 
Golash sets stage for 
"Seeds of Suspicion". 




SEEDS OF SUSPICION 

y, Cynthia 
Davidson, Carolyn 

i Feiker, 
Mrs . Ci cl is . Deborah 
Montague, Brian Rapa- 
lee , Edward Parson 
Richard Loom is. 




20 




FOOTFALLS 
FRONT ROW: James 
Brown, Paul Hatha- 
way, Paul Howes. 
STANDING: Deborah 
Ford, Joy Martin, 
Carolyn Judd, Judy 
Connell, Mahlon 
Parsons, James Ross, 
Bruce Whitney, 
Robert Wilson. 



Merry Frost and Irene Culver, 
members of the makeup 
committee, prepare Bruce 
Whitney for his role in "Foot- 
falls". 




Dramatics Club Experiences 
Another Successful Season 






The class plays this year upheld the school's reputation for superb performances 
The plays were well selected, well directed, and well produced. Three one -act 
plays were chosen for production this year: "Footfalls", a suspenseful drama 
which took place in a New England village; "The Salvation of Lonny McCain", a 
comedy concerning a juvenile delinquent; and "Seeds of Suspicion", an attempted 
murder. The gym was filled almost to capacity each night, and the plays were 
generally considered the best that have been produced in several years. 



21 






.<=*/ 




V 



GLEE CLUB 
FRONT ROW: Karen Kirby, Louise Norris, Suzanne Loud, Kim Montague, Carolyn Greenberg, Jo-Ann Cumm. 
SECOND ROW: Diane Krug, Amy Edwards, Sylvia Shea, Susan Brown, Evaline Stout. THIRD ROW: David 
Shea. James Riggot, Carolyn Madison, Betsy Feiker, Deborah Montague, Sandra Graves. FOURTH ROW: Briai 
Rapalee, Richard Loomis, Edward Parsons, Paul Howes, AmyRapalee, Judy Connell, Suzanne Rocheleau. 
BACK ROW: Caroline Fuller, Cynthia Davidson, Larry West, David Gray, Timothy Daggett, Robert Rocheleai 

J 

H.M.S. Pinafore Highlights Choral Achievement 

Under the direction of Roberta Cowell, the high school chorus staged a very com- 
mendable presentation of Gilbert and Sullivan's well-known operetta H.M.S. PINA- 
FORE in the spring of 1967. This year the remaining members of the PINAFORE 
Chorus plus many new members are meeting under the direction of Mrs. Robert 
Rapalee. This chorus performed between the acts of the three one-act plays in 
November and at the annual Christmas Assembly with traditional pieces reflecting 
the mood of the season. The chorus was proud to send five of its talented vocalists, 
all PINAFORE members, to the Western Mass. District Chorus Concert in Pittsfield.l 
Cindy Davidson, Judy Connell, Richard Loomis, Ted Parsons, and Larry West pro- 
vided an honorable representation of our school at this annual event. Ted Parsons waa 
also accepted in the All-State Chorus. With all this remarkable talent, this year's 
choral production of Lerner and Loewe's musical play PAINT YOUR WAGON promise] 
to be another success. 




Buttercup and the sailors are per- 
turbed by the repulsive Deadeye. 



22 




hCaptain and Deadeye scheme to thwart 
lovers' elopement. 





Josephine makes her debut. 



The fine cooperation between our school 
and the community was instrumental in 
making the production of H.M.S. PINA- 
FORE a brilliant success. 

All nerves were tense on the opening 
night of the performance since there 
was standing room only. The production 
proceded without mishap to the delight 
of the audience and the performers. 






Ralph is the finest sailor 
in the Royal Navy. 



23 



Warm Lights, Soft Music . . .Color The Evening 



Shining eyes, smiling faces, and 
dancing feet are all a big part of a 
successful prom. On May 19, 1967, 
•the Whale Inn, Goshen, was the 
scene of such a Happening- -and a 
beautiful Happening it was! 

Warm lights, soft music, and cool 
-tels enhanced the beauty of the 
Inn. Fresh flowers gave the air a 
scent of spring. The night was full 
of magic . 

The girls looked pretty. Their es- 
corts glowed with pride. The fac- 
ulty admired our appearance and 
behavior. We all acted like per- 
fect ladies and gentlemen. 




Joan Gagnon, queen of the Junior Prom, is shown with her court. 
They are: Cynthia Blanchet, Althea Buffum, Joan Gagnon, 
Sandra Pegg, and Susan Fuller. 




The dance floor was crowded as everyone joined in for the last c 








Members of the court relax with their escorts after the crowning of the queen. 



Mrs. Packard, cla< 
advisor, shares a 
joke with Mr. KnijB 



24 



^Fabulous" 



When our delicious dinner was com- 
pleted, there was dancing, dancing, 
and more dancing. Then came the 
most awaited event of the evening -- 
the crowning of the queen. Chosen 
Ito reign was Joan Gagnon, having 
in -her court Susan Fuller, Althea 
Buffum, Cynthia Blanchet, and 
i Sandra Pegg. 

The Junior -Senior Prom of 1967 wil 
not soon be forgotten. 







\ 




Sandra Pegg and Larry Savino enjoy an evening of dancing. 




The faculty share a table and join in on the festivities. 




One of our advisors, Mr. Branch, 
visits with Mrs. Knight during the 
evening. 




Prom queen Joan Gagnon poses with her escort, Douglas Dur- 
ham, and last year's queen, Barbara Turner. 



25 



Latin Classes Hold Roman Banquet 







Banquet Committee 
FRONT ROW: Bob Beebe, Amy Rapalee. SECOND ROW: Gary Carver, Nancy Turner, 
Beverly Parsons. BACK ROW: Cynthia Davidson, Betsy Feiker, Carrie Crompton. 



The theme of the Latin Banquet was a spring harvest festival depicting the god Diony- 
sus, and the goddess Demeter. Dionysus, god of wine, and Demeter, goddess of 
grain, represent the two main crops of the Latin people. The gymnasium walls were 
decorated with three large murals of harvest scenes. The main course of dinner was 
chicken. As usual, everyone wore name tags labeling him with a facetious name, and 
games served as entertainment. An invitation was sent to our former Latin teacher, 
Mrs. McKusick, who reigned as queen. 



Gary Carver, left and 
Cynthia Davidson, 
center, acted as es- 
corts for the guest of 
honor Mrs. McKusick. 
Billy Packard dis- 
played his talents 
as an oracle wiii Le 
Amy Rapalee was 
elected as mistress of 
ceremonies. The 
position of high priest- 
ess was filled by 
Nancy Turner, 




26 



Debaters Research National Topic 




'debator Edward Parsons examines new 
Wets for group discussion. 




Cynthia Davidson, James Edwards, Edward Parsons, Jonathan Monta- 
gue, Margret Malloy, Amy Edwards. 



"Resolved: that the congress of the United States 
should establish uniform regulations for criminal in- 
vestigation procedures." This is the topic that this 
year's debaters are heatedly discussing. The amount 
of hard work and research they put into each debate 
is a credit to our school. Though their record is not 
the greatest, their enthusiasm and loyalty should 
make us very proud of them. 



Debate coach Mr. Monte - 
bello points out pertinent 
facts relating to this year's 
topic to Amy Edwards. 




27 




Gary Bisbee, Jonathan Montague, James Estes, James Ross, 
Myron Clapp, Paula Pavelcsyk, Richard Loomis, Kenneth 
Childs, Grace Bigelow, Gary Carver, Steven Parsons, James 
Edwards, David Shea. 



Club Explores Science 

The Science Club stimulates interest in science 
through field trips, demonstrations, and study. 
The highlight of this year's program was a trip 
to the greenhouse and Clark Science Center at 
Smith College. 





President Kenneth Childs organizes club 
ects. 



28 



James Ross and Grace Bigelow participate in club discussions. 




James Ross, William Brown, Robert Ames, Betsy Feiker, Barbara Holroyd, Carrie Crompton. 



ides Keep School Library Functioning Smoothly 

ach week the Library Aides meet after school in the library. Under the able direc- 
on of Mrs. Halberstadt, our librarian, the members of this group busy themselves 
t various tasks. While one makes out the overdue booklist which is posted each week, 
le others check shelves, file cards, or prepare books and magazines to be put out 
)r the use of students and teachers. 



C 

i: 



ibrary aides Betsy Feiker and William Brown work with Mrs. Halberstadt filing cards and straightening shelves. 




Pep Rally Incites School Spirit 



This year's pep rally aroused the basketball spirit in all as the cheerleaders cleverly! 
directed skits and performed new cheers and pompon routines, which five of the girlsj 
had learned while attending cheerleading camp the past summer. The highlight of the ' 
pep rally was a mock basketball game played by two teams of cheerleaders who were ! 
led by "Coach" Monroe and Coach Grills. Due to the fair play of "Ref" Tobin, the ex-' 
pert techniques of the Burgy "Hens", and the excellent cheering ability of Al Golash, 
Bill Graves, Warren Messeck, Jim Taylor, Larry West, and Bob Wilson, the 
"Chester" team was easily defeated. This game created the mood for the first real 
game of the basketball season played that night in which Burgy won over Chester, 81- 
26. 





Coach Grills and Joanne Lawler ham it up during the performance 
of a skit. 



David Stone finds the male "cheer- 
leaders" amusing. 




The performers hold the audience's 
attention as basketball players are 
introduced. 



30 



JUMP SHOTS, 
POMPONS, 
STARTING LINES 
W.H.S. ON THE 




John Dufresne 
displays his 
stamina at the 
Greenfield meet. 




W.H.S. Wins Western 







Peter Hale sprints to the finish line. 





Will 


iamsburg 


Somers 




Williamsburg 


4 




1 W. Messeck 


9 




2 J. Taylor 


10 




3 D. Graves 


11 




5 H. Warner 


12 




6 T . Daggett 


46 




17 




at Turners Falls 


Turners 


Falls 


Williamsburg 


2 




1 W. Messeck 


4 




3 J. Taylor 


6 




5 H. Warner 


8 




7 T. Daggett 


9 




11 P. Gorham 


29 




27 




at Pioneer 


Pioneer 




Williamsburg 


2 




1 W. Messeck 


3 




4 D. Graves 


10 




5 J. Taylor 


11 




6 H. Warner 


12 




7 T. Daggett 


38 




23 




at Belchertown 


Belchertovvn 


Williamsburg 


8 




1 W. Messeck 


9 




2 J. Taylor 


10 




3 T. Daggett 


11 




4 P. Gorham 


12 




5 D. Gray 


50 




15 




at Williamsburg 


Greenfield 


Williamsburg 


2 




1 W. Messeck 


3 




4 J. Taylor 


5 




6 D. Graves 


9 1/2 


7 T. Daggett 


12 




8 H. Warner 


31 1/ 


2 


26 




at Northampton 


Northampton 


Williamsburg 


5 




1 W. Messeck 


9 




2 D. Graves 


10 




3 J. Taylor 




Burgy takes the lead as the gun shot sounds. 








Coach Grills cheers 
on top man Messeck. 



Mass. Meet 



4 H. Warner 
_6 S. Williston 
16 
at Williamsburg 
<ia.y Williamsburg 

1 W. Messeck 

2 D. Graves 

3 H. Warner 

4 T. Daggett 

5 J. Taylor 
15 

at Williamsburg 
»ke Williamsburg 

1 W. Messeck 

2 D. Graves 

4 H. Warner 

5 T. Daggett 
_7 J . T aylor 
19 

at Williamsburg 
:rst Williamsburg 

1 W. Messeck 

3 J. Taylor 

8 H. Warner 

9 P. Gorham 
10 J. Clark 
31 

at Williamsburg 




wk 



1/2 



1/2 



rs 



Williamsburg 
1 W. Messeck 
3 D. Graves 
1/2 J. Taylor 

6 T. Daggett 

7 H. Warner 



21 1/2 
*at Somers 

Williamsburg 

1 W. Messeck 

2 D. Graves 

3 H. Warner 

4 J. Taylor 
6 P. Gorham 

16 




pendent 




:k and Taylor step out ahead for 



33 



CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 
FRONT ROW: Harold Warner, Paul Elmes, Timothy Daggett, Warren 
Messeck, James Taylor, David Graves, Peter Gorham. BACK ROW: Mr. 
Grills, Donald Gray, Dale Beals, David McCutcheon, John Clark, 
Samuel Williston, John Dufresne, Peter Hale. 



The 1967 Cross Country Team enjoyed its best season in 
history, finishing with a 10-1 record in dual meet com- 
petition. In the Northern Division of the Western Mass . 
Cross Country League, the team gained a second place 
finish with a 7-1 mark, losing only to division champion 
Amherst Regional by a close 24-31 score. This loss 
brought to an end a two -season string of fifteen consecu- 
tive victories in dual meets . 

This year marked the first time that Williamsburg High 
School was represented by a team entry in the State Cross 
Country meet in Boston. The performance was a disap- 
pointment as Burgy, seeded high in Class E, finished only 
eighth in a field of 21 . 

Some of the sting was taken out of the loss to Amherst 
and the failure at Boston, as both the varsity and junior 
varsity came up with tremendous performances at U 
Mass to capture the Western Mass. Championship. 
Warren Messeck finished second to lead the varsity 
victory. 

Consistent scorers this season were Warren Messeck, 
undefeated in dual meets, and Jim Taylor, Dave Graves, 
Tim Daggett, Harry Warner, and Pete Gorham . Losing 
only Messeck and Gorham by graduation, the outlook 
looks good for Burgy's Western Mass. title defense 
next year. 



Up and Down Varsit 







FRONT ROW: Warren Messeck, Larry West, Alan Golash, Robert Wilson, Richard Hutchins, David Dewey. 
BACK ROW: David Bachand, David Graves, George LaValle, Robert Beebe, James Taylor, John Dufresne. 
Absent, Raymond Smith. 




On the boards it's the effort that counts. 



34 



Coach Tonet gives the 
team last-minute 

instructions. 




Finishes 6-13 




Spirit helps the cause. 

lie 1967-1968 basketball team experi- 
;eced a disappointing season . Although 
te team did play better ball than its 
pjcord indicates, it suffered from vari- 
es weaknesses: lack of height, 
^consistency of individual performances , 
d lack of depth in bench reserves . 
%at seemed to be a good nucleus for a 
am failed to jell until late in the 
ason. Burgy's resounding home -court 
:tory over traditional rival Smith's 
hool 72-43, two hard -fought victories 
er Gateway Regional, and Warren 
ifesseck's new school rebounding 
cord of 327 rebounds in one season 
flighted the year . 



t 




A few inches make the difference, 



Foul 



1967-68 Varsity 







Foul 


Shots 










Player 


Baskets 


Shots 


Att. 


Rebounds 


Personals 


Total Pts. 




Messeck 


128 


58 


123 


327 




314 




West 


126 


39 


72 


127 


57 


291 


543 


Golash 


66 


22 


49 


49 


49 


154 


583 


Dewey 


52 


44 


87 


172 


58 


148 


532 


Wilson 


37 


21 


35 


67 


23 


95 


475 


Hutchins 


10 


4 


12 


22 


14 


24 


167 


Dufresne 


7 








1 


6 


14 


31 


LaValle 


3 


2 


2 








8 


17 


Bachand 


3 





4 


5 





6 


10 


Smith 





6 


8 


3 


6 


6 


56 


Taylor 


3 








10 





6 


21 


Vile 


2 





2 


3 





4 


17 


Graves 


1 


1 


5 


10 


4 




26 


Beebe 











1 








3 


Totals 


438 
1229 


197 


407 


797 


242 


1073 


3070 


Opponent 


473 
1245 


163 


323 


681 


285 


1109 


3070 


As of 19 games 








Won 6 


Lost 13 







& fi $ 




FRONT ROW: David Graves, David Bachand, Richard 
Hutchins, James Taylor, George Lavalle, Robert Beebe. 
BACK ROW: Daniel McCarthy, John Dufresne, Paul Elmes, 
Samuel Williston, Thomas Hillenbrand, Charles Parsons, 
Ronald Bachand. 



Tough Losses 
Determine J. V. 

12-7 Record 





Hutch is a fighter! 



Ray Smith takes advantage c" an 
unguarded moment. 



36 



Spirited Cheerleaders Promote Enthusiasm 




This year's cheering squad was 
one of the most spirited and 
energetic squads Burgy High has 
had. These girls organized a 
very entertaining pep rally, using 
many skits and new cheers 
learned by five varsity cheer- 
leaders who attended cheer - 
leading camp in New York last 
summer. Many long hours of 
practice were reflected in their 
excellent performances at the 
basketball games. 



j.v. SQUAD 
FRONT ROW: Doris 
Rosier. SECOND 
ROW: Jane Hathaway. 
THIRD ROW: Eileen 
Loud, Susan Garden- 
ier, Deborah Cranston, 
Nancy Turner, Carol 
Jenkins. BACK ROW: 
Carla Barrett, Barbara 
Pelissier. 




Varsity Cheerleaders sympathize as J- V. players lose a 
hard-fought game. 




VARSITY SQUAD 
FRONT ROW: Irene 
Culver, Constance 
Sarafin. SECOND 
ROW: Joan Gagnon, 
AmyRapalee. THIRD 
ROW: Charlene Parrow, 
Joanne Lavvler, Cheryl 
Tiley, Charlene Sylves- 
ter. BACK ROW: Beverly 
Parsons. 



37 







VARSITY 
FRONT ROW: Donna Thackeray, Eileen Gromelski, Judy 
Connell, Dale Dextraze, Joy Neitsche. BACK ROW: Denise 
Bickford, manager; Jean Rustemeyer, Gloria Bushee, Dawn 
Ford, Jean Pomeroy, Caroline Madison, manager. 



Team work, plenty of spirit, and the encourage- 
ment of our coach, Mrs. Evelyn Kmit, enabled 
the varsity girls' basketball team to complete a 
successful season with an eight -win, seven -loss 
record. The girls, inexperienced in varsity 
play, had to work very hard to keep up with the 
record of former Williamsburg teams. A suc- 
cessful season was the reward for their diligent 
practice. 





1967-68 VARSITY 




Williamsburg 




Opponent 


18 


Pioneer Regional 


56 


55 


Smith Academy 


34 


58 


Saint Michael's 


37 


41 


Amherst 


38 


Greenfield 


19 


29 


Gateway 


37 


32 


Smith Academy 


37 


48 


Saint Michael's 


16 


20 

42 


Northampton 


29 


Northampton 


41 


38 


Gateway 


26 


25 


Amherst 


45 


38 


Hopkins 


23 


32 


Ma ha r 


34 


33 


Monson 


45 




Co-captain Gloria Bushee leaps to out- 
reach her opponent in game vs. Gateway 



38 



Hard Work Results In A Successful Season 




The junior varsity girls enjoyed a very success- 
ful season this year with a record of nine wins 
and two losses. This record reflects the vivacity 
and stamina demonstrated by the girls as they 
confronted the opposite team . The experience 
these girls gained this year will make all the 
difference in the success of the varsity team 
next year. 



Dawn Ford, co-captain, stretches to re- 
ceive a pass. 



Jean Rustemeyer catches 
the ball and heads for the 
Burgy basket. 




JUNIOR VARSITY 
FRONT ROW: Gilda Rustemeyer, Carlotta Rustemeyer, Susan Ingellis, Mary Lou Sanderson, Diane 
Dextxaze, Barbara Sarafin, Jean Clark. BACK ROW: Teresa Vayda, Deborah Ford, Charlene LeDuc, 
Miriam Graves, Sharon Lavalle, Deborah Beebe, Sally Beals, Jill Connell, manager. 




39 



Team Members Honored At Banquet 




X^ 




m 



u 



££ 



» <• 



I 










1 



As has been the custom for the past several years, the senior basketball players were 
awarded trophies; this year each girl also received a single yellow rose. Displaying 
their awards are Eileen Gromelski. Denise Bickford, manager, Jean Rustemeyer, 
Gloria Bushee, and Dawn Ford. 



The junior varsity team players present Coach David 
Grills a silver bowl in appreciation of the many long 
hours he spent training them. The bowl is inscribed 
with the over-all record for the 1967-1968 season. 




The Eighteenth Annual Basketball 
Banquet held on March 30, 1968, 
was a great success. Everyone 
present, including teachers, par- 
ents, friends, and players, enjoyed 
an excellent dinner. After dinner 
trophies and awards were presented 
to the members of the boys and 
girls basketball teams, including 
managers, and also to the cheer- 
leaders. Everyone roared with 
laughter when the "lunatic" awards 
were presented to the teams. Mas- 
ter of Ceremonies Mr. Donald Buss 
closed the program with the hope 
that the traditional Basketball Ban- 
quet would continue for many years. 



40 



Young Golf Team Gains Experience 






Golf Schedule 




Williamsburg Opponent 


at Easthampton 


2 10 


at Gateway Regional 


8 10 


Easthampton 


1 11 


Southwick 


5 7 


at Smith Academy 


8 4 


Total Won--l 




Lost --4 


Home matches played at Williamsburg Country Club. 



The 1967 golf team struggled through a rainy spring 
to record one victory and four losses in its third sea- 
son of competitive golf. Although the team received 
good and consistent performances from the brothers 
Bachand and Tom Pelissier, the squad was young and 
inexperienced. With 1967 producing a year of valuable 
experience, the team anticipates its first winning sea- 
son next year as the interest in golf at Burgy continues 
to mount . 



Philip Graves, Thomas Jenkins, Tim Daggett, Tom Pelissier, Ronald Bachand, David Bachand, Christopher 
Watling, George Childs, Peter Hale. 





SOFTBALL 
FRONT ROW: Terry Browne, Jill Connell, Teresa Vayda, 
Susan Sylvester, Beverly Parsons. SECOND ROW: Alana 
English, Nancy Turner, Judy Connell, Sally Beals, Sandra 
Pegg, Jean Pomeroy, Gloria Bushee. BACK ROW: Carolyn 
Madison, Gloria Rapalee, Kathleen Mougin, Donna 
Thackeray, Sharon Lavalle, Cynthia Davidson, Mary 
Delisle, Judy Bannister, Marsha Squira, Margaret Clark, 
Denise Bickford. 




Williamsburg Opponent 



Team Has Rained- Out 
Season 



At Northampton 


16 


30 


Sanderson 


12 


13 


At Belchertoun 


20 


8 


Northampton 


9 


14 


At Charlemont 


25 


12 


Charlemont 


26 


26 



The Softball team had to face many problems during 
the season and was able to come out of it with only 
a fair score record. Because of the rain, games and 
practices were canceled, and the regular ball park 
was unable to be used when practices were held. 




Co-captains Judy Connell 
and Gloria Bushee demon- 
strate form. 



42 



Baseball Team Has Fair Season 




FRONT ROW: Brian Thackeray, Donald Gray, Anthony Seymour, Robert Scott, John Dufresne, William Graves, 
: Robert Wilson, Michael Eaton, David Adair. BACK ROW: Brian Rapalee, Gary Linscott, Steven Brown, James 

Taylor, Roger Clark, George Lavalle, Wayne Beebe, James Brown, Richard Hutchins, Wayne He ideman, Robert 
iBeebe. 

| A costly injury to pitcher Wayne Beebe coupled with poor hitting and inexperience 
produced a 7-8 mark for the 1967 baseball team. Two young pitchers, George 

i Lavalle and John Dufresne, assumed starting roles; and each gave good performances 

! while gaining valuable mound experience. The season's highlight was Beebe's third 
consecutive no -hitter in the' opening game vs. Gateway, extending a string started in 

! 1966 against Holyoke Trade and Westfield Trade High Schools. Playing in their last 
game for W. H. S. were Mike Eaton, Wayne Beebe, Bill Graves, and Tony Seymour . 



1967 



Won - 




Player 


AB 


R 


H 


RBI 


AVE. 


PO 


A 


E 


HP 


BB 


SO 


SAC 


HR 


Seymour 


36 


14 


7 


4 


. 195 


13 


1 


4 


3 


17 


10 


1 





Dufresne 


37 


5 


1 


1 


.027 


7 


13 


5 





9 


23 








Graves 


40 


13 


12 


8 


.300 


15 


24 


12 





16 


9 


2 


1 


Wilson 


49 


8 


13 


13 


.266 


27 


20 


4 





9 


7 





1 


Lavalle 


38 


3 


7 


3 


. 185 


6 


16 


2 





10 


10 








He ideman 


42 


9 


9 


5 


.214 


10 


23 


13 


1 


8 


13 








Beebe 


26 


3 


7 


6 


.269 


33 


9 


3 





9 


8 








Eaton 


49 


6 


11 


8 


.220 


104 


9 


8 





6 


14 





1 


J. Brown 


26 


5 


3 


1 


. 115 


64 


2 


6 


1 


8 


9 








Gray 


17 





2 


2 


.118 


11 





2 





2 


6 


1 





Scott 


5 


2 


1 


2 


.200 


10 





2 





2 


3 








Adair 


6 











.000 


1 











3 


5 








Linscott 


7 


1 








.000 


1 








1 





5 








Clark 


1 











.000 














3 


1 








Thackeray 
S. Brown 





1 



































6 


1 


1 


2 


.167 





1 








3 


3 








Daggett 


1 











.000 

















1 








Totals 


387 


73 


74 


55 


. 191 


302 


118 


61 


6 


105 


128 


4 


3 


Pitcher 
Beebe 


IP 


RUNS 




HITS 


SO 


BB 


WON 


LOST 


ER 


ERA 








23 2/3 


11 




10 


38 


14 


3 


2 


3 


.88 








Dufresne 


23 


21 




24 


29 


14 


1 


1 


14 


4.26 








Lavalle 


54 1/3 


58 




61 


42 


19 


3 


5 


23 


2.96 








Totals 


111 


90 




95 


109 


47 


7 


8 


40 


2.52 








No-Hitter 




























Beebe Vs. 


Gateway 


8-0 






43 



















Class Rivals Meet 

In Intramural 
Games 



Four classes vying for the 
championship of the school in- 
different sports can only produce 
action. In the fall several aspir- 
ing boys collect to show their 
skill in running cross country. 
Some boys run the race with 
unexpected speed; others never 
finish. Winter comes and with it 
arrives the basketball season. 
The classes form teams, and 
heated competition results. Fol- 
lowing closely on the heels of 
basketball comes volleyball. 
Thrills and spills are the order 
of the game, as the class teams 
strain to return the ball to their 
opponents and ultimately defeat 
them. The competition is vigor- 
ous; the victory is delicious; the 
word is GO! 




Ray Smith, Alan Golash, and Bill Graves are congratulated by | 
Pete Gorham as the top three intramural runners. 




Victory brings a 
happy smile from 
Zell Lofton. 



The girls intramural volleyball games create enthusiasm 



John Hall shows Tim 
Daggett how the se- 
niors play the game. 



LEADERS, 
FOLLOWERS, 
NON-CONFORMIS TS, 
W.H.S. ON THE 




45 



Freshmen And Sophomore Classes 




FRESHMEN 
FRONT ROW: Diane Ryan, Carolyn Greenberg, Jill Connell, Barbara Pelissier, Carla Barrett, Mary Allen, 
Teresa Vayda, Mary Brisbois, Debra Keller, Susan Gardenier, Ann Brown, Diane Lannon, Linda Rhoades, Carol 
Hebert, Doris Rosier. SECOND ROW: Diane Krug, Sally Beals, Donna Russell, Jane Hathaway, Margaret Malloy, 
Sharon Lav alle, Jeanne Dodge, Deborah Ford, Charlene LeDuc, Natalie West, Maureen Boyer, Joy Neitsche, 
Susan Brown, Maryann Korowski, Nina Korowski, Deborah Beebe, Shawn Cole, Deborah Brisbois, Merry Frost, 
Jacqueline Webb, Alana English, Lindsay Delisle, Amy Edwards. THIRD ROW: Michael Kolosewicz, Alan Thack- 
eray, Paul Bacon, Kevin Ells, James Minelli, Mark Eldred, Steven Clark, David Bauver, Donald Munson, Michael 
Seymour, Guy Bush, David Shea, David Kreps, Bruce Buffum, Steven Parsons, Robert Thomas, Thomas Mosher, 
Robert Shaw, Henry Chapin, Kim Dresser. BACK ROW: Richard Witherall, John Clark, Philip Tirrell, Alan Estes, 
Kim Gardenier, James Taylor, Samuel Williston, J ef fry White, John Harry, Timothy Hurd, Harry Warner, James 
Ferron, Dale Beals, Kim Crossman, Russell Culver, Steven Healy, John Burnett. 




SOPHOMORES 
FRONT ROW: Terry Browne, Nan Christenson, Cynthia Buzzee, Cynthia Davidson, Mary 
Delisle, Grace Bigelow, Carrie Crompton, Deborah Cranston. BACK ROW: Gary Bisbee', 
Daniel Boyer, Stephen Brown, Kenneth Childs, John Clark, Wayne Cernak, Myron Clapp, 
Gary Carver, Ronald Bachand. 



46 



t Larger Than Ever 



IJUmost everytime you turned around in school this year, a freshman or sophomore was 
jhere; for there were seventy -eight freshman and sixty -five sophomores, in two of the 
piggest classes ever to enter Williamsburg High School. Both classes contributed 
IKreatly to extra-curricular activities such as basketball and dramatics. The freshmen 
meld a successful dance in April and the sophomore students sponsored two very good 
llances . Many of these students were on the Honor Roll; the sophomore class main- 
Rained the highest scholastic average during the year. The freshmen and sophomores 
hertainly had the ability to make things move, and they did. 




SOPHOMORES 
FRONT ROW: Bryan Thackeray, Raymond Smith, James Ross, Charles Parsons, Dario Pittore, Douglas Vile, 
William Packard, James Vile, John Nute, John Otis. BACK ROW: Patricia Watling, Susan Sylvester, Sylvia 
Shea, Patricia Tiley, Amy Rapalee, Nancy Turner, Evaline Stout, Joyce Pash, Mary Lou Sanderson, Maureen 
Roberts, Hope Vogel, Sandra Pittsinger, Barbara Sarafin, Beverly Parsons. 




I 



SOPHOMORES 
FRONT ROW: Terese Deyette, Bonnie Mercier, Diane Dextraze, Kathleen Mougin, Deborah Montague, Sandra 
Graves, Carolyn Madison, Betsy Feiker, Nancy Loud, Carol Jenkins, Eileen Loud. BACK ROW: Daniel Mc- 
Carthy, James Edwards, David McCutcheon, Jonathan Montague, Richard Loomis, Douglas Johnson, Dennis 
Lavalle, Timothy McCarthy, Richard Hutchins, Thomas Hillenbrand, Dennis Leamy, Paul Elmes, John Dufresne 



47 



Juniors 

- ~ 







FRONT ROW: Marilyn Messeck, Nancy Pittsinger, Joelle O'Brien, Diane Warner, Sandra 
Suchecki, Suzanne Rocheleau, Kathleen M alone, Jean Pomeroy, Charlene Parrow . SECOND 
ROW: William Lockwood, Kenneth Parsons, William Shaw, Gary Linscott, Alan Lapalm, 
Arthur Smith, David Matuewezski, Edward Parsons, Brian Rapalee, Thomas Pelissier. BACK 
ROW: Richard Turner, George Lavalle, Dennis Lake, Thomas Vachula, Paul Sanderson, Gary 
Moran, Charles Norris, Robert Pomeroy, Robert Scott, Victor Wilson. 




FRONT ROW: Margarette Brown, Irene Culver, Joyce Fountain, Barbara Holroyd, Marlene 
Adair, Karyn Bauver, Susan Kellogg. SECOND ROW: Mary Ingellis, Lianne Cone. Mane 
Durant, JoAnne Healy, Elizabeth Hull, Dale Dextraze, Judy Connell, Elaine Clark. BACK 
ROW: Donald Gray, David Bachand, Leo Aloisi, Robert Beebe, Joseph Desmarais, Lynn Harry, 
Timothy Daggett, David Graves, Peter Golash, Thomas Jenkins. 



48 



Seniors 



GO is the word for the class of '68. 
Our break with conformity started 
when we held our prom at the Whale 
Inn. Through the year we have with 
spirit supported and participated in 
athletics; individuals have been 
recognized by the National Merit 
Program; and we have impelled the 
student body by our strong Student 
Council leadership. The pep and 
vigor of the class of '68 is truly 
defined by the word GO. 




Chris Feiker rests after a hard 



run. 



Callie Judd, Eileen Quigley, Chris Feiker, and Dave 
Haskell enjoy their studies. 






49 





ROBERT STANLEY AMES 
Glee Club 1; Science Club 1,2; 
Library Aide 2,3,4; Dramatics 
Staff 2; Tattler Activities Editor 4 
National Honor Society 3,4. 

DENISE LOUISE BICKFORD 
Glee Club 1,2; Drill Team 1; His- 
torian 1; Basketball Manager 2,3, 
4; Softball Manager 1,2,3,4; 
Highlight Staff 1 ; Dramatics Staff 
3,4; National Honor Society 3,4; 
Tattler Staff 4. 




CYNTHIA JEAN BLANCHET 
Cheerleader 1, 3, 4, Co-captain 2; 
Tattler Staff 4. 

MARY PAULETTA BREEN 



JAMES WARREN BROWN 
Baseball 1,2,3,4; President 1; Stu- 
dent Council 3,4; Tattler Sports 
Editor 4; Dramatics 2,4; Boy's 
State Rep. 3; Student Guide 4; 
National Honor Society 3,4. 



WILLIAM FREDERICK BROWN 
Treasurer 1; Science Club 1,2,3, 
4; Library Aide 2, 3,4; Dramatics 
2,3,4; Chorus 3; Tattler Staff 4; 
National Honor Society 3,4. 



Our class officers are Dawn Fori 
treasurer; Larry West, president [ 








50 



GEOFFREY SHIMER BROWNE 
Glee Club 1. 

ALTHEA MARIE BUFFUM 
Glee Club 1; Dramatics Staff 3; 
Tattler Staff 4. 



GLORIA ANNE BUSHEE 
Basketball 1,2,3; Co-captain 4; 
Drill Team 1. 

JAMES EDWARD CERNAK 
Basketball 2,3,4. 



Sob Wilson, vice president; and 
oanne Lawler, secretary. 







/ 




ROGER PAUL CLARK 
Baseball 2,3,4. 




GERALD CONNELL 




51 





i 



VICKIE JEAN CORWIN 

Glee Club 1; Drill Team 1; Tattler 

Typist 3,4. 



JO -ANN ELIZABETH CUMM 
Glee Club 1; Chorus 3,4; Tattler 
Typist 3,4. 










DAVID WILLIAM DEWEY 
Basketball 2,3,4; Baseball 2; Stu- 
dent Council 2,3,4; Glee Club 1; 
Tattler Business Manager 4; Dra- 
matics Staff 2, 3,4; Student Guide 
3,4. 



DONALD PAUL DEXTRAZE 

ALAN JOSEPH DEYETTE 
Transferred to Gateway Regional. 



ANNE MARIA ESTES 
LINDSAY ESTES 






52 






MICHAEL ANTHONY ESTES 



FREDERICK CHRISTIAN FEIKER IV 



DAWN MARIE FORD 
Basketball 1,2,3, Co-captain 4; 
President 2; Historian 3; Treasurer 
4; Glee Club 1; Tattler Staff 4; 
Dramatics 4. 



WENDY CAROL FOSTER 
Basketball 1; Glee Club 1. 

JOAN ELIZABETH GAGNON 
Cheerleader 1, 2,4, CaptainJ.V. 
3; Student Council 3; Glee Club 1; 
Dramatics Staff 2,3,4; Tattler 
Staff 4. 








ALAN ADAM GOLASH 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, Co-captain 4; 
Cross Country 2,3. 

PETER CROWELL GORHAM 
Cross Country 1,2,4, Co-captain 
3; Student Guide 3,4; Dramatics 
Staff 3,4. 




53 




WILLIAM DONALD GRAVES 
Basketball Captain 1,2,3; Base- 
ball 1,2, Co-Captain 3; Cross 
Country 1, Co-Captain 2,3; Stu- 
dent Council 3, Student Council 
Treasurer 1,2; Student Guide 2, 
3.4; Student Asst. Coach 4. 




Senior girls study English literary beginnings. 





JEFFERY DOW GREEN 
Glee Club 1. 

EILEEN ELIZABETH GROMELSKI 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1; 
Drill Team 1; Softball 1. 





PETER JOSEPH GROMELSKI 

JOHN FRANCIS HALL 
Treasurer 3; Student Guidr 4. 



54 



This page is made possible through the courtesy of GRAVES EQUIPMENT 





DAVID ALLEN HASKELL 



PAUL MILLARD HATHAWAY 
Chorus 3; Student Guide 4; Dra- 
matics 4. 

PAUL BRENT HOWES 
Baseball 1; Student Council Presi- 
dent 4; Glee Club 1; Chorus 3; 
Dramatics 2,3,4; National Honor 
Society 3,4. 





CAROLYN JUDD 
Glee Club 1; Chorus 2,3; Drill 
Team 1; Dramatics 1,2,4; Dra- 
matics Staff 3; Tattler Staff 4. 

ANN MARIE KELLOGG 
Glee Club 1; Drill Team 1; 
Tattler Staff 4. 





55 





KATHERIXE MARIE KING 
Tattler Typist 4. 

ROY RAYMOND LA VALLEY 





JOANNE MARGARET LAWLER 
Cheerleader 2,3,4; Secretary 2, 
3,4; Student Council Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Tattler Editor 4; Press 
Club 2.3,4. 

SHARON ANN LOOMIS 
Glee Club 1; Drill Team 1; Dra- 
matics Staff 4; Tattler Typist 4. 



MRS. MARIE PACKARD 

Helpful, 

Efficient, 

Affable . . . 

Senior Adviser 
On the GO\ 




56 



This page made possible through the courtesy of the WHALE INN 



ALAN BIRKETT LOUGHNAN 
Historian 2; Library Aide 2,3; 
Science Club 2; National Honor 
Society 3,4. 

JOY LYNN MARTIN 

Glee Club 1; Drill Team 1; 

Dramatics 4. 








/ 



MR. ROBERT BRANCH 
Entertaining, 
Intellectual, 
Debonaire . . . 
Senior Adviser 
On the CO ! 




WARREN AVERY J. MESSECK 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Cross Country 

o-captain 1,2,3,4; Tattler 
Staff 4. 



HENRY FRANCIS NIETSCHE 



JAMES MICHAEL O'BRIEN 
Audio-Visual Aide 1,2,3. 






57 




MAHLON KINGSLEY PARSONS 
Chorus 3; Dramatics 4. 

PAULA JEANNE PAVELCSYK 
Glee Club 1,2; Dramatics Staff 4; 
Literary Magazine Staff 4; Science 
Club 1,2,3,4; Press Club 3,4; 
National Honor Society 3,4. 



It 






• 








1 












r~~" * m 


■1 



One of our favorite seniors, John 
Hall, shows perseverance in 
Problems of Democracy class. 



SANDRA LEE PEGG 
Student Council 1 , Secretary 2; 
Glee Club 1; Drill Team 1; 
Tattler Sports Editor 4; Softball 
1,2,3; Dramatics Staff 2,3,4. 



MICHAEL JOSEPH PELISSIER 
Golf 1,2. 



EILEEN EUGENIA QUICLEY 






58 



DEBORAH LYNN ROBB 
Glee Club 1. 

ROBERT ALBERT ROCHELEAU 
Chorus 3,4; Student Guide 4. 




Q 










/ 




JEANNE RUSTEMEYER 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1; 
Drill Team 1; Dramatics Staff 4. 

CONSTANCE MARIE SARAFIN 
Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, Co-captain 4. 






Al Golash and Connie Sarafin 
. . . Mutual Interests 





t 



CYNTHIA HAZEL STONE 

DAVID BRUCE STONE 
Coif 2. 



CHARLENE ANN SYLVESTER 
Cheerleader 1, 2, 3,4; Glee Club 
1; Tattler Staff 4. 




Paul Hathaway and Jeff Green 




KENNETH HART TAYLOR 

DONNA LOUISE THACKERAY 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 1; 
Softball 1,2,3,4; Tattler Typist 4. 




60 




CHERYL ANN TILEY 
Cheerleader 1, 3, 4, Co-captain 2; 
Secretary 1; Glee Club 1; Tattler 
Assistant Editor 4; Softball 1,2; 
Press Club 1; National Honor 
Society 3,4. 

PATRICIA LOUISE WARNER 
Glee Club 1; Dramatics Staff 1, 
2, 3, 4; Press Club 4; Tattler Art 
Editor 4. 




EDWIN NIELSON WEBB 




LAWRENCE EDWIN WEST 
Basketball 1,2,3, Co-captain 4; 
President 3,4; Treasurer 2; Stu- 
dent Council 4; Glee Club 1; 
Chorus 3,4; All State Chorus 4; 
Tattler Staff 4; Dramatics 4; 
Student Guide 3,4. 

ROBERT MATTHEW WILSON 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Baseball 1, 
2,3, Captain 4; Vice President 1, 
2,3,4; Glee Club 1; Tattler Staff 
4; National Honor Society 3,4; 
Student Guide 3,4; Dramatics 4. 




This page made possible through the courtesy of WEST CLOTHING STORE. 



61 



HAYDENVILLE 
Adair's Variety 

Market 
Chuck's Radio 
Ferrante Company 
*Fred G. Dewey, 
Range and Fuel 
Oil 
Haydenville Sav- 
ings Bank 
Hillside Orchard 
W. E. Kellogg & 

Son 
McAllistor's Esso 

Station 
Noble Manufactur- 
ing Co. 

WILLIAMSBURG 
Bray's Service 

Station 
Brown's Soda Shop 
Cichy's Garage 
Myron Clark, 

Building 

Contractor 
*F. N. Graves & 

Son, Inc . 
Hemenway Insur- 
ance Co. 
Jean's Colonial 

Cleaners 
Kosier's Package 

Store 
*Lashway Lumber 
Len's Fine Foods 
Lunch Box 
Mr. & Mrs. Leslie 

Packard 
Pete's Barber Shop 
Smart Beauty Shop 
Strout Realty 
Thomas' Barber 

Shop 
Twin Cedar 

Nursery 
Vernon P. West, 

Life and Health 

Insurance 
Williamsburg Fuel 

Co. 
Williamsburg High 

School Cafeteria 

Staff 
Williamsburg 

Pharmacy 
Williamsburg 

Snack Bar 

AMHERST-HADLEY 
Elm wood Hotel 
Hampshire Business 

chin ■ Co. 



ontributed $10 
Contributed $15 

Contributed $25 




62 







CHESTERFIELD 
Bisbee Brothers 
Blue Ridge Blue- 
berry Farm 
Charles Bisbee Jr. 
Elmbrook Farm 
Fred B. Healy Jr. 

GOSHEN 
*Duensser Decora- 
tive Metals 
♦George D. Judd 
LaTourette's 

Restaurant 
Pierce's Store 
***Whale Inn 

WESTHAMPTON 
Loudville Store 
F. H. Loud & Son 
Fuller Country 

Horse Camp 
Lyman 

Manufacturing 

WORTHLNGTON 
**Hampshire Service 
Transportation 
Corp. 
Dr. John Modestow 










63 



NORTHAMPTON 

A Friend 

Ann August 

Autumn Inn 

Bailey- Doane Insurance 
Agency 

Bon Ma re he 

Cahill G Hodges 

Calvin Ice Cream Co. 

Calvin The at 

Carlson's 

Cesco Container Mfg. 
Corp. 

Charlie's Sunoco Station 

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

Cohen Brothers 

College Towne Shops 
The Daily Hampshire 
Gazette 

E. J. Cigar Co. 

Fines Store 

Foster-Farrar Co. 
'• Graves Equipment 

Hampshire Motor Sales. 
Inc. 

Hampshire Supply Co. 
Harlow Lugga. 
Harry Daniels, Inc. 
*H. L. Childs G Son 
Jack August Restaurant 
King G Cushman, Inc. 
Labbee Chevrolet. Inc. 
'Moggio & Conz 
Morrison Optician 
Nelson's Menswear 
Northampton Barber Shop 
Northampton Motors, Inc. 
Northampton Music O 
Northampton Plumbing 

Supply Co. 
Northampton Radiator Co. 
Northampton Sportsmen's 

Center 
'Pleasant Market 
Pleasant Street Pharmacy 
Purse glove's 
The Quill, Inc. 
Sherman Jewelers 
Ted's Boot Shop 
Tripod Camera Shop 
Typewriter Shop. Inc. 
WHMP Radio Station 
Wood G Strand 



FLORENCE 
Betty's Beauty Salon 
Breguel's Service Station 
Christianson Paint G Wall- 
paper Supply 
Cooper's Dairy Corp. 
Flore ix lco 

Cray's Market 
Keyes' Flower Shop 
Look Restaurant 
Murduff's Jewelry Store 
Paddock's Cleaners and 
lors 
♦♦♦West Clothing Ston. 










64